athletic trainer studentsMarch is National Athletic Training Month and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) is utilizing the month “to spread awareness about the important work of athletic trainers (AT).” To do our part we asked a few of our athletic training students in our Doctor of Philosophy in Health Sciences to share why they love being ATs. 

The Rewards Athletic Training

“For me, it’s simply just seeing the process of someone going from unable to perform an activity to then performing that activity at a high level.” — Aaron Kilfoyle, PhD in Health Sciences – Athletic Training

“It’s all about building relationships with everyone and having an impact on well-being.” — Kim Barber Foss, PhD in Health Sciences- Athletic Training

“The most rewarding part is seeing someone who has been injured and seeing they can go back and perform at the level they want to perform at and know that I had a role in that.” — Chelsea Pasukinis, PhD in Health Sciences  – Athletic Training

“It’s being able to help injured athletes overcome the fears and obstacles that come along with athletic participation.” — Keith Pacific, PhD in Health Sciences – Athletic Training

“For me, it’s rewarding to come alongside patients, getting to enter their stories, and advocate for their needs and see them succeed.” — Alyssa Anderson, PhD in Health Sciences – Athletic Training

“The most rewarding part is seeing the athlete go back to participation after you’ve worked with them, especially when you work with them for a long time and they finally get back to participation.” — Hannah Stedge, PhD in Health Sciences – Athletic Training

“Getting to watch my seniors on senior night. Getting college athletes in as a freshman, being with them through the ups and downs of their athletic journey, high points of success in careers and low points of injury. And knowing what role I got to play for that brief time will make a lasting impact in their lives. That’s the most rewarding part.” — Nicholas Wright, PhD in Health Sciences – Athletic Training

Athletic Training at RMUoHP

Currently, RMUoHP has athletic trainers enrolled in its Doctor of Philosophy in Health Sciences (PhD) program, which includes concentrations in Athletic Training, Human & Sport Performance, and Health Promotion & Wellness. The university also just announced the start of a Master of Science in Athletic Training Practice degree, a new master’s degree to help athletic trainers meet the 2020 Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) standards.

RMUoHP is proud to honor our athletic trainer students, faculty, and alumni throughout the U.S. and the service they provide to the healthcare field and their communities.